Year

Total

Whites

Slaves

Indians

Negroes or
Free Persons of Color

Chinese

1810

2,482

1,915

547

 

10

 

1820

3,576

2,409

1,149

 

16

 

1830

5,669

 

 

 

 

 

1840

7,141

 

 

 

 

 

1850

10,538

 

5,341

 

 

 

1860

15,379

 

8,096

1

 

 

1870

13,324

 

 

3

6,984

 

1880

17,010

8,938

 

1

8,067

4

1890

19,629

 

 

 

 

 

1900

21,620

 

 

 

 

 

1910

24,128

 

 

 

 

 

1920

17,912

 

 

 

 

 

1930

15,890

 

 

 

 

 

1940

18,541

 

 

 

 

 

Footnotes
   
Note 1 The 1860 census of Assumption Parish listed one Indian named Josephine age 15, living between the Solar and Pererra families, in the area of Brule St. Vincent, Ward 9, p. 87.
Note 2 This was actually one family living in Ward 10 of Assumption Parish: House 112 Family 130 - John Combella age 30, Indian born LA; Marie Combella age 20 Indian born LA, and Mariel Combella age 3, Indian born LA. Also in their house was Marceline Sulia age 15, given as white, born LA. A Solar family lived nearby. There is a record of baptism of a John William Campela (son of John Campela and Celestine Derydar) born 10 Sept. 1871, bt. 23 Dec. 1871 at St. Elizabeth Church. Sponsors were Perique Sanchez and Marie Alleman (BRDA 12-119) A John Compellon, age ca. 25, was buried 10 Mar. 1872 from St. Elizabeth Church Records (BRDA 12-148).
Note 3 The Acadians who settled in the area of Bayou Lafourche below the church at Plattenville actually were those who came to LA in 1785 on the ships from France. The settlement of the 1760's is a misstatement copied by many historians and is incorrect.
Note 4 Louis Monginot in 1832 purchased the tract where Napoleonville now stands and had it platted in lots.
Note 5 The first Nicolas Verret served as Lt. Governor, then as Commandant and Judge of the First Acadian Coast from 1770 until his death. He took over the office after his brother-in-law Louis Judice became Commandant and Judge at Lafourche des Chetimachas (now the area of Donaldsonville) on the Second Acadian Coast. The first Nicolas was living in St. James Parish, the original Cabahanoce Post until his death. It was his son, Nicolas Verret (II) who was Commandant at Valenzuela from 30 Sept. 1786 until 15 Feb. 1798. Auguste Verret (son of Nicolas I, and brother of Nicolas II) served as Commandant at Valenzuela from 16 Feb. 1798 to 27 Nov. 1799.
Note 6 This information was taken from De Bow's Review, Sept. 1850, p. 288. In 1810 Maxile BOURG lived on the Attakapas Canal near Lake Verret and on 10 April 1811 he sold his right to operate the ferry from the Lafourche Canal to the Attakapas which had been granted by the State Legislature. If MOREAU lived there for 30 years, it must have been before the Louisiana Purchase in 1803.
Note 7 At the time when the site was owned by George MATHER. See also Madewood Plantation
Note 8 Woodlawn was torn down years ago. Only a couple of markers still survive in the little family graveyard, which is on the side of Hwy. 308.
Note 9 He is buried in Christ Episcopal Church Cemetery, Napoleonville LA, with dates born 8 May 1853, died 4 May 1952. His wife was Nannie Mosely Jones, also buried there.
Note 10 See The Church of the Assumption Through the Years by Mrs. Celine B. Verret (published 1995) for a complete history.
Note 11 Harnett T. Kane, "Floating Chapel Celebrates Its Second Anniversary in the Bayous," New Orleans Item-Tribune, 17 April 1938.